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Thursday, 26 May 2011

Silver Clouds: The 1934 Grand Prix Season

It was inevitable that my love of drawing would one day lead me to express artistically my passion for Grand Prix racing history.


In researching the racing history of the 1930s, I came across material that captivated me. There were many stories about technological developments, about political manoeuvres, about rivalries between racecar teams, and, above all, about drivers.


In particular, the 1934 Grand Prix season formed a turning point in Grand Prix racing history. Disrupting the ebb and flow of the established racing teams’ fortunes and successes, two new, powerful teams suddenly joined the fray of the 1934 season. These teams would establish clear and total Grand Prix dominance from 1935 to 1939, but their auspicious performances in 1934 did not go without notice.


With the idea of passing on these great stories, I decided to write a little book and provide an illustrated overview of the season, with a focus on the 9 key races and 12 of the people who were part of it.


After months of research, writing, creating art, design, layout and finally, assembly and packaging, my little less than perfect book on the 1934 Grand Prix season is ready and available. It’s published as a limited edition of only 50 copies, signed, numbered and custom wrapped.


It’s been a stimulating exercise of tying it all together, visually and narratively.


I hope that the story, the art and the package will offer the reader a memorable experience.


Please contact me at paul.chenard@hotmail.com if you are interested in purchasing a copy.



4 comments:

Rick Swain said...

Paul

Congratulations! I know you've worked long and hard on this project and I also know it's a labour of love.

Good luck with sales.

Rick

Automobiliart.com said...

Thanks Rick, it's very appreciated.
Cheers!

stefan marjoram said...

That looks terrific, very nicely presented too. Looks like you put a lot of effort into that.

Automobiliart.com said...

Thanks kindly, Stefan.
I'm glad I didn't know how much work it would be ... :)
Cheers!